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30 Jul 2018
TWO E-PAPER BUS DISPLAYS LANDING AT SYDNEY AIRPORT

E-paper bus displays will soon be landing at Sydney Airport, making it easier for commuters and visitors to navigate the bus network.

 

Sydney Airport will be the first site outside the CBD to score the new kindle-like passenger information displays, trialled earlier this year at two busy bus stops at Town Hall and the QVB.

 

Now the popular initiative will be rolled out at the airport to benefit passengers on Sydney’s most popular bus route – route 400, which operates between Burwood and Bondi Junction stations via Sydney Airport’s domestic and international terminals, carrying well over 380,000 customers each month.

 

The technology will be installed at two airport stops ahead of the September school holidays.

 

“We’ve been getting such great feedback on these cutting-edge displays and we’re excited to expand this technology to the airport for bus customers who travel on the 400,” Coordinator General Marg Prendergast said.

 

“These innovative displays allow us to stay in touch with our customers and let them know vital information about their trip in real-time, such as the expected arrival time of the next service and its capacity.

 

“This route services both the international and domestic terminals so expanding the e-paper initiative to the airport is a great opportunity to make life easier for both regular commuters and tourists, helping them plan ahead and get where they need to be.”

 

Believed to be an Australian first, the compact digital screens are a sustainable, solar powered and innovative solution to a previously paper based communication channel.

 

Information used in the new signage comes from real-time bus data, populated by on-board GPS on each bus, giving customers helpful arrival and capacity information.

 

The displays can also provide incident alert messaging for disruptions like road closures associated with special events like Mardi Gras and Anzac Day, or unplanned disruption like a traffic incident affecting the broader network.

 

The infrastructure is patented by Western Sydney tech outfit Mercury Innovation, a design and engineering company producing world leading outdoor e-paper digital signage solutions.

 

Their inventive technology is currently deployed in over 10 countries with some of the world’s leading transport agencies trialling the technology.

 

Mercury Innovation’s previous collaboration with TfNSW delivered the world’s first digital 'parking signs' used in Moore Park.